From Cabinet To Chick Brooder

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 12:00 pm on Monday, March 17, 2014

savvyhousekeeping cabinet to chick chicken brooder

When we moved in to this house, we pulled a white cabinet from the bathroom that we didn’t want anymore. I was going to sell it on Craigslist, but then we had a better idea. With a few alterations, we turned the bathroom cabinet into a brooder for my baby chickens.

savvyhousekeeping chick chicken nursery brooder diy from cabinet

savvyhousekeeping cabinet to chick chicken brooder diy

First, my husband put in a removable floor on the cabinet. It can be popped out of the brooder for easy cleaning. Then he made a window for the chicks by cutting a square rectangle in one wall and attaching a 4″ roll of hardware cloth (the screen) to it with a staple gun.

savvyhousekeeping cabinet to chick chicken brooder diy

That was all there was to it. We added newspaper to the bottom as lining, a water bottle, and baby chick mash that we bought at the feedstore. And finally, we put in our two baby chicks, Lucy and Penny.

Baby chickens need warmth. According to this site, you “start with 90-100 degrees F the first week. Then, lower down temperature by 5 degrees every week until the chicks have feathers that will protect them.” We tried putting a light bulb in the brooder, but it seemed unsafe, so we decided to use a space heater to heat the room to the temperature they need. The heater’s thermostat keeps the room from getting too cold. We also put the heater beside the brooder so that some of the heat goes into the box with the chicks.

So far, the chicks seem happy. We got them on Friday and they have already grown about a half inch and are starting to develop pin feathers on their wings. We must be doing something right.

savvyhousekeeping from cabinet to chick chicken brooder diy

After the chickens outgrow the brooder, we will recycle the cabinet again by turning it into a seed starter for next year’s plants. I guess I want to see how many babies can I put inside of one old bathroom cabinet.

savvyhousekeeping lucy baby chick
Lucy

savvyhousekeeping penny baby chick
Penny

From Bike Parts To Taxidermy Bike Holders

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:05 am on Friday, February 21, 2014

Check out this cool project from Vienna-based designer Andreas Scheiger. He took parts from old bikes and turned them into “taxidermy” racks that are strong enough to hold a bike.

If I were a bike person, I would have one of these. [This Is Colossal]

Wine Cork Spools

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:56 am on Monday, February 17, 2014

Here’s another idea for what to do with wine corks: use them as spools for thread.

According to Addicted 2 DIY, the project couldn’t be simpler. Just wind the thread you want to save around the cork and cut a notch in the top to hold in place. Pretty nifty. [Storage Geek]

Turn An Old Sweater Into Cozy Boots

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 9:21 am on Wednesday, February 5, 2014

There are lots of things you can do with an old sweater, and apparently one of them is to turn them into boots. By exploiting the ribbing and warmth of the sweater, you can turn it into cozy boots to get you through these cold winter months. Here are three how-tos to consider:

UPCYCLED SWEATER BOOTS. In this how-to, the instructions tell you to cover a cheap pair of flat with the sweater, like so:

I like this version of the project, because using the flats gives you a sturdy sole for the bottom of the boot. As a bonus, you can upcycle old flats this way too.

UPCYCLED SWEATER SLIPPER BOOTS. These boots don’t have much of a sole, but the photo looks good. With some tweaking, you could make some decent boots out of this how-to.

UPCYCLED SWEATER SLIPPERS. These are slippers, not boots, but the project clearly show how to make a sole out of felt.

Combine the last two how-tos, and you could end up with pretty cool boots made from one old sweater.

From Patio Umbrella To Garden Trellis

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:03 am on Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Here’s a great idea from Flickr: when your patio umbrella gets worn out from exposure, as they are wont to do, don’t throw it out. Instead, strip off the material and use the frame as a trellis for beans, cucumbers, or other climbing vines.

Milk Crate Dresser

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:47 am on Thursday, November 21, 2013

I like this idea from Design Sponge. It’s a dresser with milk crates instead of drawers. It’s kind of edgy and cool, plus a good way to reuse a dresser with broken/missing drawers.

DIY Natural Branch Coaster

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:48 am on Thursday, November 7, 2013

I am tempted to make these Natural Branch Coasters. All you do is cut a log to coaster-sized wood slives and paint with varnish. These wood look great on the backyard patio set. Great idea.

10 Ways To Reuse A Milk Jug

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:35 am on Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Milk jugs are surprisingly useful things to have around. Here are 10 ways to recycle a milk jug:

savvyhousekeeping 10 ways to recycle a milk jug watering can

1. Turn it into a watering can.

savvyhousekeeping 10 ways to recycle a milk jug garden scoop

2. Or a scoop.

savvyhousekeeping 10 ways to recycle a milk jug plant greenhouse frost guard

3. Use as a greenhouse to protect seedlings from frost.

4. Make mudguards for your bicycle.

savvyhousekeeping 10 ways to recycle a milk jug bird feeder

5. Turn into a bird feeder.

6. Cut into circles and use as divider when freezing hamburger patties.

7. Make a dustpan.

savvyhousekeeping 10 ways to recycle a milk jug paint holder

8. Use as a paint holder.

9. Pierce the bottom and use for plant irrigation.

savvyhousekeeping 10 ways to recycle a milk jug storm trooper mask

10. Turn into an awesome Storm Trooper Helmet, just in time for Halloween.

From Milk Jug To Greenhouse

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:51 am on Friday, October 4, 2013

Now that fall is upon us, seedlings may need protection from frost. A way to do this is to turn a plastic milk jug into a mini-greenhouse for the plant.

Simply cut the bottom off the jug and place over the plant. It protects from frost and insects while still letting sun and air in on the plant, thus giving them a chance to get established.

From Wine Glass To Bell Jar

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:09 am on Friday, September 20, 2013

Sarah broke a wine glass, so instead of throwing it out, she turned it into this cute little bell jar. I love projects like this, where people turn trash into something interesting or useful. Have a good weekend!

« Previous PageNext Page »