Make A Reading Lamp Out Of A Water Jug

Filed under: Recycling — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:30 am on Tuesday, June 24, 2014

I am very curious to see if this works.

Supposedly, if you slap a headlight onto a jug of water, it illuminates the water and makes a reading lamp/lantern for your tent when you’re camping.

Seems plausible. Has anyone tried this?

10 Summer Squash Recipes

Filed under: Food/Drink — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:02 am on Monday, June 23, 2014

My squash plants are already producing plenty of young pattypan squash and zucchini. Time to use them up! Here are some summer squash recipes I’m considering.


ZUCCHINI QUESADILLAS

Cheese, zucchini, and corn in a tortilla. How can this be bad? I might try adding some pesto too.

SUMMER GRILLED VEGETABLE PIZZA

Homemade pizza with grilled veggies and fresh mozzarella. I can’t believe we haven’t done this yet.

PATTYPAN SQUASH WITH EGGS

A new way to use squash in breakfast.

OVERSTUFFED PATTYPAN SQUASH

Pattypan squash just seems designed for stuffing. Here’s Alton Brown’s version.

LIGHT CHICKEN AND SQUASH LASAGNA

A healthier twist on lasagna. I have to admit, I would probably add more cheese.

SQUASH TART

Another good one from Martha Stewart. This recipe uses zucchini, but any summer squash would work.

CHOCOLATE ZUCCHINI MUFFINS

These muffins are a hit every time I make them.

EASY ZUCCHINI PICKLES

I discovered these quick zucchini pickles last year. Highly recommended.

SWEET CORN AND SQUASH SOUP

I love the idea of this, but I would probably use broth and milk instead of water in the soup base.

ZUCCHINI PIZZA SLICES

I’m so curious about this recipe. It looks like it could be really tasty.

Pattypan Squash With Eggs

Filed under: Food/Drink — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:56 am on Friday, June 20, 2014

Here’s a great breakfast idea from Sunset Magazine: Pattypan Squash with Eggs.

You hollow out the inside of the squash, bake, then put in the egg, and bake again until the eggs set.

Since I am growing pattypan squash this year and I have chickens, you can be I’ll be trying this recipe out.

It’s almost as interesting as Baked Eggs In Avocado.

Make Your Own Sealed Sandwiches

Filed under: DIY — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:22 am on Thursday, June 19, 2014

In general, sealed sandwiches aren’t the kind of thing I would spend money on, but I can see one exception: road trips. They would be a good way to feed a kid a healthy, frugal lunch without getting a mess all over the car.

And with a little gadget, you can make sealed sandwiches yourself. Unsophisticook explains how.

Handtrux Backhoe

Filed under: Kids — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:18 am on Wednesday, June 18, 2014

I like this unique beach toy, the Handtrux Backhoe. Great for the sandbox too. $16

How To Childproof A Box Fan

Filed under: DIY — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:17 am on Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Disclaimer: This method of childproofing isn’t going to stop a determined child from sticking a finger in the fan. It’s just meant as an easy way to add an extra barrier in front of the blade. You should still use common sense and keep the fan away from a child.

We found an easy, cheap way to childproof our box fan. All it took was a mosquito screen that you can buy for $5 from any hardware store.

To childproof, we took off the front of the fan, put a layer of screen in front of the blade, and replaced the front.

It works great. The air still goes through the screen, but it adds a layer of protection against Savvy Jr. putting his finger on the blade.

How To Childproof A Box Fan

You Will Need:

    Box Fan
    Mosquito Netting
    Screwdriver
    Knife
    Glue gun (optional)

Directions.

1. Unscrew and remove the top of the fan.

2. Stretch the screen over the fan.

3. Put the front back on the fan.

4. Screw the fan top back in.

The screws will go right through the screen. When you get all in place but the last two or three, have someone else stretch the screen tight. Finish up the screwing.

5. Cut the excess screen away. We found a sharp knife works best. Just cut close to the fan as possible.

Ta-da! Childproof(-ish) fan.

If you want to make this hack permanent, add a bead of hot glue around the edge of the screen before replacing the top of the fan. The glue will help hold the screen in place.

Sure beats buying a whole new fan.

How To Make A Pisco Sour

Filed under: Food/Drink — Savvy Housekeeper at 8:11 am on Friday, June 13, 2014

If you’re looking for a cocktail for Father’s Day this year, but are tired of whiskey-based cocktails (this does happen occasionally), DIY Cocktails and I suggest the Pisco Sour.

Pisco is a grape brandy produced in Chile and Peru. The Pisco Sour has been around in some form since at least the 19th century. It’s the Peruvian national cocktail.

To make a Pisco Sour, combine pisco with lemon juice and simple syrup, shake with raw egg whites*, and add a splash of club soda and a dash of bitters.

The end result is a drink halfway between a margarita and an old fashioned: perfect for a summer’s day, but still manly as all get-out.

Pisco Sour

Ingredients:

    1 1/2 ounce pisco
    3/4 ounce lemon juice
    1 ounce simple syrup
    2 ounces club soda
    2 egg whites
    1-2 dash bitters

Directions:

Separate the egg yolks from the egg whites.

In a cocktail shaker, combine pisco, lemon juice, simple syrup, and egg whites. Add ice.

Shake for a long time, at least a solid minute. You want to agitate the eggs enough to form a foam.

Pour the cocktail into a glass. Add the club syrup and top with bitters. Enjoy!

Happy Father’s Day.

* Ah yes, the raw egg whites. As we’ve talked about before, when shaken properly, egg whites magically turn into foam that’s perfect for cocktails. If you’re concerned about this, you can buy pasteurized egg whites at the grocery store. Or just don’t make this cocktail. (This Blood Orange Old Fashioned is also quite tasty.)

Shakespeare Cookie Cutter

Filed under: Pretty/Cool — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:31 am on Thursday, June 12, 2014

Shakespeare Cookie Cutter!

Here he is fully frosted.

I want one of these.

[Bookriot]

How To Turn An Adult Tee-Shirt Into A Toddler Shirt

Filed under: Kids — Savvy Housekeeper at 7:10 am on Wednesday, June 11, 2014

There was this tee-shirt that I never wear. I didn’t like how it fit, but I liked the cute graphic on the front. So I decided to cut it down into a shirt for Savvy Jr.

All it would take, I thought, was to resize the shirt and stitch up the sides. I could even re-use the adult neck and the shoulder seams. Easy peasy.

And it was. Easy, that is.

Here’s How To Turn An Adult Tee-Shirt Into A Toddler Shirt

You Will Need:

Tee-shirt
Matching thread
Kid’s tee-shirt (for the pattern)
A paper bag
A pen
Pins
Sewing chalk
A ruler
Scissors
A sewing machine (or needle and thread, if you’re industrious)
An iron

Directions:

1. Pick A Kid’s Tee-Shirt To Use As A Template.

I needed one of Savvy Jr.’s shirts to use guide for how much to cut the adult tee-shirt down.

I picked this orange shirt with the shark on it because it’s still big on him. I wanted something he could grow into.

2. Make A Pattern From The Old Kid’s Tee-Shirt

I used a paper bag to make a pattern. First I tucked the kid’s shirts arms under, like so:

Then I traced the tee-shirt on a bag with sewing chalk. Using a ruler to measure, I added 1/2 inch seam allowance around the outside of the shirt.

I also traced both of the sleeves, right and left, and made two more patterns for each one. Again, I added 1/2 inch seam allowance on all but the top, which would be placed on the fold.

In the end, I had three pieces of pattern: A Body, the Right Sleeve, and the Left Sleeve.

3. Cut Out The New Shirt.

Cutting along the seam, remove the sleeves from the adult shirt and set aside.

Carefully pin the Body piece of the pattern to the shirt, like so:

Cut out, making sure that you leave the top shoulder seams and neck intact.

Next, take one of the sleeves and fold in half. Pin the new sleeve to it, like so:

You’ll notice I reused the hemming on the original sleeves by lining the pattern up so that the bottom of the sleeve was the same as on the original shirt. No need to do something that’s already done.

Cut out the sleeve. Repeat with the other sleeve.

Now you have three pieces of the shirt: the Body, the Right Sleeve, and the Left Sleeve. All you gotta do now is sew it up!

4. Hem The Shirt.

Using an iron, fold the 1/2 inch seam allowance on the front and back of the shirt and pin. Sew up the seam. Press the seam with an iron.

5. Sew The Sleeves To The Shirt.

With right sides together, lay Right Sleeve on the right side of the shirt. Pin it so that the center of the sleeve is lined up with the shoulder seam, and the bottom of the arm pit lines up with what will become the bottom seam of the sleeve.

Sew, using 1/2 inch seam allowance.

Iron your seams flat.

If the seams pucker—and they very well may—rip out the section of the seam where the pucker is, stretch it taut, and pin. Sew again, being careful not to let the material pucker this time.

Repeat with the Left Sleeve.

6. Sew Up The Sides.

Almost done!

With right sides together, pin up the sides and bottom of the sleeves with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Sew up the seams. Press with an iron.

Ta-da! Finished shirt.

Here’s the tee-shirt on my son:

As you can tell, it’s pretty big on him. This shirt will be around for quite awhile.

Which is the point: that shirt is getting a lot more use now than it got languishing inside a dresser drawer.

Leaving the adult neck was a little lazy, I realize now. When I do this again, I will probably cut it down.

But still, not bad for an hour’s worth of sewing time.

A Note On Comments

Filed under: News — Savvy Housekeeper at 9:27 am on Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Dear Readers,

I enjoy hearing from you, and hope you will continue to contact me with your helpful thoughts and insight.

The problem is that SPAM has taken over my comment section and I just can’t keep up with it. So for the time being, I’m turning comments off on all new posts and will be turning comments off completely in the future.

However, you can still email me with your feedback. Please feel free to drop me a line at Savvy (at) Savvyhousekeeping (dot) com.

You can also comment on:

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Thanks for understanding.

Life is too short for comment spam!

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